Blind Low Vision NZ is taking part in Global Accessibility Awareness Day on Thursday 19 May to start important conversations about accessibility within Aotearoa.

One in four Kiwis live with a disability. This means that one quarter of New Zealanders face access barriers each day, making some daily tasks and activities unnecessarily difficult.

Accessibility consultant Julius says “inaccessibility is preventing that person from accessing something that they should have access to.”

This year for Global Accessibility Awareness Day, Blind Low Vision NZ is holding a social media campaign where we ask staff, volunteers and members of the blind, deafblind and low vision community to take a photo of themselves with a sign stating what accessibility means to them.

Accessibility is different for everyone – it may affect you directly, or someone you are close to. Global Accessibility Awareness Day is an opportunity to have conversations and to learn how small changes to the way you do things, can have a huge impact on someone’s accessibility needs.

Blind Low Vision NZ aims to raise awareness about accessibility, not just for people who are blind, deafblind, or have low vision – but for all Kiwis who have accessibility requirements.

“We hope that New Zealanders learn something new about accessibility and start to implement changes in making Aotearoa more accessible for all” Chief Executive, John Mulka says.

So we ask you, what does accessibility mean to you?

Cathy holding a sign that says "Accesibility means I can keep working as an administrator even though I have low vision"
Cathy holding a sign that says “Accesibility means I can keep working as an administrator even though I have low vision”